Iconic: The Postage Stamps of Lance Wyman

Niko Courtelis
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Graphic designer Lance Wyman created commemorative postage stamps for some of the most historically significant events of the late twentieth century: Olympiads, the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., the 1970 World Cup, the first manned landing on the moon, and the twenty-­fifth anniversary of the United Nations. Studying the entirety of Wyman’s philatelic work—forty-­three stamps in all—Niko Courtelis details how well they have withstood the test of time. With comments throughout by Wyman himself, this book (co-published with Katherine Small Gallery to accompany an exhibit of Wyman’s stamps) is sure to reintroduce you to the designer you thought you already knew.

Nine Collages for Bill Corbett

Michael Russem
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Over the 2017 Memorial Day weekend the entire staff of Kat Ran Press got together to make a little book of collages for one of their favorite and most loyal clients: Bill Corbett of Pressed Wafer.

Dogs are OK

Michael Russem
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Dogs are OK. We don’t love them, though. We do, however, love photographs, postcards, prints, and drawings of dogs. For this slender volume we’ve collected some of our weird and lovely favorites to make something for everyone–whether a lover of dogs or not. Co-published with Pressed Wafer and with an introduction (in English and Japanese) by Michael Russem, this one’s for anyone who’s got a new puppy, lost an old friend, or thinks that dogs are just OK—or slightly better than OK.

Notes on Postage Stamps

Eric Gill
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Eric Gill had exacting and pointed opinions about postage stamps, their purpose, and their design. Unfortunately, his theories didn’t always hold up when put into practice, and he had a less than successful career as a designer of stamps. Accompanied by nine of Gill’s previously unpublished preparatory drawings and sketches for stamps, Notes on Postage Stamps is a short, previously unpublished essay by Gill in which he succinctly lays out his philatelic ideas—some of which were a little too idealistic and some of which were spot-on. All of them are interesting and thought-provoking.

Towards a Reform of the Paper Currency

W.A. Dwiggins
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[U. S. paper money] stands as the prime symbol of value in the infinite transactions of a great commercial nation. It is worth its face in gold . . . but, my God! what a face! —W.A. Dwiggins

Why Stamps?

Ivan Chermayeff
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A good graphic designer pays attention to small things, and there are few things smaller than stamps. Ivan Chermayeff has been paying attention. For almost fifty years the acclaimed graphic designer has been making collages—and in those collages stamps and mail have played an important role. Envelopes are heads. Stamps are eyes and lips. However, one could be forgiven for never having noticed this, as the whole in Chermayeff’s collages is greater than the parts.

Philatelic Atrocities

Niko Courtelis
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Niko Courtelis is a creative director, filmmaker, and butcher of stamps. We should each be so lucky to be carved up with such adventure and care. Cut and shockingly reassembled, these stamp collages have scandalous fun with the often mundane world of stamps. Philatelic Atrocities takes these paper Frankensteins and turns them into a lookbook of freaks, oddities, printing, and design.

My Suffolk Downs

Melissa Shook
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Melissa Shook came to Boston from New York in 1974 to teach photography at MIT. She soon discovered Suffolk Downs. Though she did not bet, she felt comfortable at the track, enjoying the sounds, the crowd and the people who worked with the horses. Over the next thirty years she documented her Suffolk Downs in photographs and poems concentrating on the trainers, hot walkers, exercise riders, horse shoers, dentists, those who delivered hay, feed, and ice, and the jockeys and their agents.

Designing the Mentoring Stamp

Lance Hidy
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Lance Hidy, the accomplished designer of books, posters, types, and stamps, takes us through the process of designing a postage stamp while explaining how the small Mentoring stamp relates to his larger body of work. Thirty-eight full-color reproductions illustrate the photographs, designs, and drawings which were part of the design process, as well as related posters and illustrations from the last thirty years of Hidy’s work.